Tag Archives: flowersnob

dahlia

Fabulous Dahlia (said with a slightly camp san-fran accent!)

These wondrous flowers really need no introduction, a lover of the lime light, Dahlia’s take centre stage whether it is in the garden or in a vase. I find these super easy to grow flowers an essential addition to my gardens. They start to flower just after my first flush of roses are fading, they champion the gap, filling my bouquets with the craziest most outrageous blooms.

DSC_0027

Regarded as a vegetable rather than a garden flower initially, dahlias were discovered in the 16th century by Spanish conquistadors, not until 1872 was a box of tubers sent to Holland. Within a few years Victorian catalogues listed hundreds of varieties, trust the Victorians to see sense in growing them for beauty and not nutrition! The Victorians believed it to be most dignified to have a Dahlia border, and only the most aristocratic garden grew them.

I have to confess, when I started growing flowers to sell, I rather looked down my nose at Dahlia. I used to think of them as tacky and garish. And in some respects they are garish. The colours can be intensely strong, and their form also can be overwhelming. The dinner plate Dahlia’s which can be 30cm wide is a little too big for me, but mostly Dahlia’s are fun, they have such a variety, I would challenge the biggest flower snob to not be able to find one they didn’t like. ( I think there was too many negatives there…you know what I mean!)

DSC_0024not-lydia

What I think has to be said is that the Dahlia is quite the most rewarding plant. For a bed of manure to grow in,( they are super hungry!) Dahlia will reward you with endless amounts of flowers, keep cutting, they keep coming, all the way to the first frosts. They last forever in a vase….F.y.i only cut them when they are fully open! The really huge headed varieties are difficult to arrange, but I’m sure they have a place somewhere…other than the dinner plate! I can’t recommend them enough…….Go forth and plant some Dahlia!

These wondrous flowers really need no introduction, a lover of the lime light, Dahlia’s take centre stage whether it is in the garden or in a vase. I find these super easy to grow flowers an essential addition to my gardens. They start to flower just after my first flush of roses are fading, they champion the gap, filling my bouquets with the craziest most outrageous blooms.

DSC_0027

Regarded as a vegetable rather than a garden flower initially, dahlias were discovered in the 16th century by Spanish conquistadors, not until 1872 was a box of tubers sent to Holland. Within a few years Victorian catalogues listed hundreds of varieties, trust the Victorians to see sense in growing them for beauty and not nutrition! The Victorians believed it to be most dignified to have a Dahlia border, and only the most aristocratic garden grew them.

I have to confess, when I started growing flowers to sell, I rather looked down my nose at Dahlia. I used to think of them as tacky and garish. And in some respects they are garish. The colours can be intensely strong, and their form also can be overwhelming. The dinner plate Dahlia’s which can be 30cm wide is a little too big for me, but mostly Dahlia’s are fun, they have such a variety, I would challenge the biggest flower snob to not be able to find one they didn’t like. ( I think there was too many negatives there…you know what I mean!)

DSC_0024not-lydia

What I think has to be said is that the Dahlia is quite the most rewarding plant. For a bed of manure to grow in,( they are super hungry!) Dahlia will reward you with endless amounts of flowers, keep cutting, they keep coming, all the way to the first frosts. They last forever in a vase….F.y.i only cut them when they are fully open! The really huge headed varieties are difficult to arrange, but I’m sure they have a place somewhere…other than the dinner plate! I can’t recommend them enough…….Go forth and plant some Dahlia!